SMS Kaiserin Augusta

Germany (1892)

The second German protected cruiser

The design of this wooden-sheated protected cruiser started in 1887, however design speed as specified was larger than for the Irene class. In order to achieve it with just two propellers, decision was taken to swap to three shafts. This was the first time for a German warship and the configuration was repeated on further vessels.

Kaiserin August was laid down in Germaniawerft in 1890, launched 15 january 1892, and completed in 29 august 1892. She displaced 6218 tons, and was larger than Irene with 123.2 m overall, 1536 m wide and 7.4 m draft. Her triple shaft arrangement, each linked to a triple expansion steam engine, rated for a total of 15,650 hp, for a top speed of 21.5 knots, 4.5 knots better than the Irene.

Note: This post is a placeholder. There will be a complete overview of the class in the next future, officially released on Facebook and other social networks

Kaiserin Augusta in New York

The Kaiserin Augusta was armed with four 150 mm guns fore and aft, and eight 150 mm broadside guns, plus eight 88 mm dual purpose, and four Revolver cannons and five 350 mm torpedo tubes. She has a 2.75 inch protective deck but overall protection was rather light. Her armament was revised, at first it was seen as transitory, and in 1898, rose to twelve 150 mm guns, eight 88 mm dual purpose guns. In 1903 she was sent to drydock for another refit, where she was fitted a larger bridge, and her TTs removed but the bow axial one.

In 1914 she was obsolete and transferred as a training ship. In 1916 her armament was revised to one 150 mm, four 105 mm, fourteen 88 mm of four different types to train gunners. She survived the war and was BU in 1920.

Specifications

Displacement: 6218t FL
Dimensions: 123.2 x 30 x 8.50 m
Propulsion: 3 shaft TE, ? boilers, 15,650 hp and 21.5 knots.
Armour protection: Deck 50 mm
Crew: 430.
Armement: 4 x 150, 8 x 105 mm, 8 x 88 mm AA, 4 Rev cannons, 3 x 350 mm TTs.

SMS Blücher
Braunschweig class battleships (1902)

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