Farragut class destroyers (1958)

US Navy Flag 10 destroyers 1957-1959

Cold War US Navy Destroyers:
Fletcher DDE
Gearing DDE
Gearing FRAM I
Sumner FRAM II
Forrest Sherman
Mitscher
Norfolk

Farragut DLG 13
USS William Pratt (DLG-13)

These ten great destroyers (DLG 6-15), sometimes referred to as the Coontz class, built between 1957 and 1959, were the first missile escorts designed on plan in the US Navy. Their specifications dated back to the 1954 Schindler Committee Report, which called for the use of fast escort ships, armed primarily with fast-moving anti-aircraft guns, and smaller ASM, as well as anti-ship torpedoes inspired by memory. of the battle of Samar (Leyte, 1944) where destroyers had obstinately defended an impressive Task Force Carrier Force against a Japanese fleet. The Terrier missile was not originally planned, and the role of the ASM defense was reinforced in the face of the growing threat of fast Soviet SNAs.

Their first ASM system was the RAT, followed quickly by ASROC. The Farragut took over the imposing flush-deck hull of the previous Mitscher, but were much heavier and larger. They received the NTDS in 1961, and ASRO refills shortly thereafter, the sacrifice of both 76-mm hulks in 1969-77, as well as quadruple Harpoon missile ramps. Two buildings also received Vucan Phalanx rapid guns in 1973-75. The Mahan tested the SM-2 (ER) in 1979 and their large size allowed them to also implement the double-decked version of the Tartar, replaced from 1983. These buildings were set aside in 1989-92. In 1990, eight were still in service.

Characteristics:

Displacement: 3277t, 4526t FL.
Dimensions: 133.2 x 14.3 x 4.6 m
Propulsion: 2 turbines, 4 HP boilers, 2 propellers, 70,000 hp. and 33 knots max.
Crew: 333-350
On-board electronics: SPS29, 39, 2 SPG51 radars, SQQ23A sonar.
Armament: 2 x 127mm DP guns, 1×2 Tartar SM1 (42), 1 ASROC ASM (16), 2×3 TLT ASM 324mm.

USS Long Beach (1959)
California Class Cruisers (1972)

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